Some Pictures from the Shroud Tomb

The Shroud Tomb was discovered by Shimon Gibson in 2000. It is a tomb from the first-century in which was found a skeleton that had scalp and hair still connected to the skull and the shroud placed over the body. How was this preserved? Well, usually, the bones of the affluent were collected a year after death, when it was known that the flesh had composed, in order for them to be collected into an ossuary. (This process is called ossilegium.) These bones were not collected because the man died of leprosy. For more detail, especially the significance of this tomb, see James Tabor's blog post "The Tomb of the Shroud: The Earliest Case of Leprosy". Oh, by the way, we encounter not just one tarantula, but two (!!!) in this tomb, which was scary! Here are some pictures:

The small entrance from the outside.

The small entrance from the outside.

Our team entering the tomb.

Our team entering the tomb.

It was dark inside!

It was dark inside!

The hole above is where a body would be placed. The hole below is where ossuaries would be stacked. So the grave could be used for several members of the family.

The hole above is where a body would be placed. The hole below is where ossuaries would be stacked. So the grave could be used for several members of the family.

First-century smoke! This is a little niche where a lamp holder would have been inserted into the wall so the lamp could be set on it to provide light. This is the smoke from the lamps' fires.

First-century smoke! This is a little niche where a lamp holder would have been inserted into the wall so the lamp could be set on it to provide light. This is the smoke from the lamps' fires.

There are some bones remains in this tomb.

There are some bones remains in this tomb.

Another angle.

Another angle.

Prof. Craig A. Evans talking to us about ancient tombs.

Prof. Craig A. Evans talking to us about ancient tombs.

Shimon Gibson's sketch of the tomb. Originally from Prof. Tabor's blog.

Shimon Gibson's sketch of the tomb. Originally from Prof. Tabor's blog.